Tuesday, December 18, 2012

"I don't like green food."

 Today's post is from the very sweet Tyrean!
 I am sorry I am still behind on comments. I am working on getting caught up, so hopefully I will have them done soon. Thank you to all who left them!
 Jack


 Plus, we could do dance moves as we’re escaping.  Perhaps a ballet number!”
Battle scenes are complicated, even without ballet numbers. The first draft is fun: characters are running into danger, slashing with swords, and leaping out of harm’s way just in time. Then I step back and realize that in my adrenaline junkie urge to ride through the battle scene on my main character’s shoulder, I’ve completely lost sight of the rest of the characters. What happened to them? Do they live? Die? Escape? Win? Can I write it in a way that keeps a readers interest and still explains what’s going on?
I’m near the end of the final revision of Champion in the Darkness, a Christian YA fantasy about young sword apprentice Clara who is caught up in a battle for her life and the lives of others around her. They have to flee their country. In one scene, Clara’s pinned up against a wall defending a group of younger kids and fighting against a huge number of enemies with just a few friends and mentors at her side. So . . .how do they flee?
Well, they don’t do a ballet number, as Piper suggests in that quote from The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan.  However, if I had read Riordan’s book before I wrote that scene, it might have been tempting.
Question to consider: How do you make your battle/fight scenes engaging?
Champion in the Darkness will be out February 11th, 2013. If you’re interested, please check out my blog Tyrean’s Writing Spot for updates. http://tyreanswritingspot.blogspot.com/
Many Thanks to the Amazing, Improbable Jack for hosting me on her blog for her book blog party!

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18 comments :

  1. Oh battle scenes - they're completely not my hot point. I've written ... two that I like. Of course, both of them my MCs win, but anyway.

    For one, it was two kids against a multi-headed creature. It was in FP from the girl's point of view, but she managed to add in what he was seeing as well. Wasn't too hard.

    The other one, it's a largish army against a much smaller group of people. I told it from the POV of the old man who was watching it from a nearby hill.

    So ... that's what I do with battle scenes (that I've likes. So, anyways!)

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  2. Kendra - those sound like fun and challenging scenes to write! I think the pov really makes a difference in scenes like that . . .the person seeing/telling/sharing the story has a unique outlook.

    Thanks for having me here today Jack!!!

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  3. If I absolutely have to write a battle scene, I choose a character that doesn't know how to fight. They close their eyes and swing their sword around and I try to describe the chaos that follows. That's been my MO for several years now, but maybe it's time to branch out...

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    1. I like that MO . . .that's funny, and it works

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  4. Battle scenes for me are tough. And epic fantasy is replete with battle scenes, so I'm always looking for ways to improve. Enjoyed the post!

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    1. Thanks Jeff! I'm looking forward to reading your battle scenes in your book!

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  5. I am really looking forward to your book, Tyrean.
    My fight scenes all involve spaceships, and I guess I keep up by having the main character notice the battle as a whole now and then. But for the most part, it does just focus on the view through his eyes.

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    1. Wow, Thanks Alex!
      Your fight scenes definitely engage the reader's attention, keep us in your MC's pov and let us know what's going on the whole time. Good writing!

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  6. Hmmm, I'm not very good at writing fight scenes. I tend to write them too abstract, mainly describing what happened rather than getting into the blood and pain and dirt and gore of the moment. Something I'm trying to work on. :)

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    1. It's tough to get into the nitty gritty and keep the full scene going on, and then to know how much gore . . .well, it can be a handful. Keep working on it! I'm sure that you're doing great!

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  7. Congrats to Jack!

    I try to injure people so the battle isn't perfect and may be more of a challenge for the character. Maybe they don't win this one, but learn something that may win the war. :)

    Usually, I then have the husband unit read them over, since men are more action oriented.

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    1. I like that idea . . .no winning this one, but learning something to win the war.
      And getting the husband unit to look it over sounds good too.
      Thanks!

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  8. This story sounds very interesting! I love writing battle scenes, though it can be challenging to fit all the viewpoints I want into the scene!

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    1. Thanks! I agree that fitting in all the viewpoints is tough.

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  9. Hmm, I shall have a look-see at your blog later!

    As for battle scenes, I solve them by not writing them. My characters are typically much more 'let's think this over and avoid the situation completely' since sometimes I'm too nice to them and don't want to brutalize them. When I do write a battle scene, though, I typically try to have the characters holding some sort of conversation to keep the main character noticing what's going on around them as they're getting distracted by others talking.

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    1. I like that . . .I didn't think about having a conversation in the battle scene(s) I wrote . . .hmm, maybe next time, or a late revision.

      Thanks!

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  10. Jack - many thanks for hosting me again!!!!

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    1. You are very welcome! Thank you very much for doing it! I enjoyed your post!

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